Cervical Cancer Prevention Policy Atlas

  • Every year, over 25,000 women die from cervical cancer in Europe
  • HPV vaccine almost 100% effective in preventing the persistent HPV infections that cause cervical cancer
  • All 46 countries need to do more to put an end to preventable deaths
  • Belgium, Denmark, Ireland and the UK are the policy champions
  • Azerbaijan and Belarus worst performing countries

The Cervical Cancer Prevention Policies Atlas scores 46 countries throughout geographical Europe on national cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination programmes as well as online information to highlight political will to prevent cervical cancer in Europe.

“HPV-related cervical cancer is a preventable and curable disease. It is established that vaccination and well-organised cervical screening programmes can reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality and yet some European countries are failing to provide these policies that can truly save women’s lives”, commented Neil Datta, EPF Secretary.

“While effective policies and political will are a crucial step in the right direction, without proper implementation of the policies, cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates will still remain high.”

The Atlas clearly illustrates the issue of healthcare inequality across Europe with eastern and southern countries lagging behind in cervical cancer prevention policies, which unfortunately results in a disproportionately heavy burden of cervical cancer incidence and mortality in those regions.

“Nobody should be denied healthcare according to where they live. All European governments need to do more to raise public awareness around HPV and cervical cancer to ensure more people are vaccinated and regularly attending cervical screening tests. A simple first step is to improve online information on HPV and cervical cancer prevention.”

Expert Group

A group of experts in cervical cancer and oncology supported EPF in designing the questions and structures for the Atlas.

 

Atlas

Report on HPV vaccination

Infographic